What has the Supreme Court said in cases dealing with the Citizenship Clause?

A:

Four years after the 1868 ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment, the Supreme Court confirmed in the Slaughterhouse Cases that the Citizenship Clause “put[] to rest” the notion that “[t]hose . . . who had been born and resided always in the District of Columbia or in the Territories, though within the United States, were not citizens.”  Later, in 1898, two years before the first Deeds of Session for American Samoa were signed, the Supreme Court explained in United States v. Wong Kim Ark that the Citizenship Clause “affirms the ancient and fundamental rule of citizenship by birth within the territory, in the allegiance and under the protection of the country.” 

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