Equally American Blog

  • Selma and the Right To Vote in U.S. Territories

    “I gave a little blood on that bridge in Selma, Alabama for the right to vote.” – Rep. John Lewis, referring to the 1965 assault by Alabama state troopers on peaceful marchers.

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    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The Act was one of the most critical legislative victories of the Civil Rights movement because it outlawed the discriminatory voting practices adopted in several southern states after the Civil War that were used to prevent people of color from gaining access to the ballot.

  • Support Equality for U.S. Territories

    As 2014 draws to a close, it’s amazing how far we’ve come, even as there is a long way yet to go. 

  • Help the Tuaua Plaintiffs Make It To DC!

    On Monday, February 9, 2015, the plaintiffs in Tuaua v. United States will have their day in Court. But your help is needed to get them there!

  • Argument Set in D.C. Circuit Case About Constitutional Rights in U.S. Territories

    On Monday, February 9, 2015 at 9:30 a.m. the D.C. Circuit will hear the appeal in Tuaua v. United States, which argues that the U.S. Constitution guarantees birthright citizenship to all born on U.S. soil, including U.S. territories.

  • Represent the U.S. Virgin Islands & Right to Vote on Constitution Day

    Here is something to think about.  Today the U.S. Constitution celebrates its 227th birthday.  In just a few years, the U.S. Virgin Islands will celebrate its 100th birthday as part of the United States. Yet Virgin Islanders still cannot vote for President, lack full voting representation in Congress, and the Obama administration recently argued in court that citizenship for people born in territories like the VI is a mere congressional privilege rather than a constitutional right.

  • Represent Guam & the Right to Vote on Constitution Day

    Here is something to think about.  Today the U.S. Constitution celebrates its 227th birthday.  Guam has been a part of the United States for more than half those years – 115 to be exact. Yet the people of Guam still cannot vote for President, lack voting representation in Congress, and the Obama administration recently argued in court that citizenship for people born in territories like Guam is a mere congressional privilege rather than a constitutional right.

 
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